Planning the Shape and Content for FYC

PRAXIS BLOG 16SEPT2014:“Planning the Shape and Content for FYC”

 

 

I : The wisdom of sound and sense

Make the semester itself mirror the writing process for an individual paper.”

(Dan Regan p. 26)

         It is the unity of sound and sense that makes poetry function on a higher register of evocation and linguistic artifacts derived with primary consideration for the cleanliness of presentation or the exhaustive categorical scope of its content. When planning my courses but moreover when presenting and representing them on the page a keen awareness of how they represent not only the raw material to be gone over during a period of time but also the interrelationships and synergistic capacity of that content to create ways of thinking about experience modes of understanding necessary skills for professional life as well as the nuanced understanding of issues inherently bound up in what we call the human condition.

 

Works of art generally have a catalytic effect through their tangibility of being. They thus enable the classroom enactment—over the course of a semester—of principles they enumerate and embody.

 

As such, if the syllabus can, somehow, stand as a symbolic microcosm for this intended big-picture project through the manner in which it conveys information to an audience. The symbolism of syllabi standing for what they aim to provide (or, if you prefer, the meta-compositional register) shows both genesis and fruition of the FYC’s instructional programé. That syllabi created utilizing the principles, procedures, methods, and critical approaches they provide the structural groundwork for the temporal and spatial bounds of the course that also presents itself as at the courses telos writ large.

 

By imparting learning outcomes for each day in a classroom that eventually, inform and being about its creation, this syllabus embodies the reflective process that can be deployed in commissioning a founding document—and an artistic work that far exceeds the linguistic content of its pages.

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